Scandinavian Kitchen Ideas and Designs

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Pergola House
Pergola House
Benjamin WilkesBenjamin Wilkes
Pergola House is a timber framed single-storey extension to a Victorian family home in the Lee Manor Conservation Area featuring a rich and colourful interior palette.
Compact Scandi
Compact Scandi
Sola KitchensSola Kitchens
Opting for a truly Scandinavian design, the owners of this home work in the design industry and wanted their kitchen to reflect their uber cool minimalistic style. To achieve this look we installed white cabinetry, oak skog panelling, Quartz Calcatta Gold worktops and various brass details. Behind the island features a large mirror which enhances the light and spacious feel of the room.
Scandinavian Kitchen London
Scandinavian Kitchen London
Sustainable KitchensSustainable Kitchens
With natural materials and clean lines, this Scandinavian-inspired kitchen channels stylish serenity. The European Oak brings a warm feel to the london kitchen extension balanced with white cabinets and worktops. The long run of tall cabinets houses a bespoke bar cabinet, double larder and a utility cupboard. The cool and calm nordic aesthetic continues into the banquette seating designed to create more space to allow for an open-plan lounge area as the social hub of the home.
Carmarthen Place
Carmarthen Place
Renato O'Leary | Breeze Photo StudioRenato O'Leary | Breeze Photo Studio
Hero Shots Kitchen and Staircase materials
Framework House
Framework House
Amos Goldreich ArchitectureAmos Goldreich Architecture
Amos Goldreich Architecture has completed an asymmetric brick extension that celebrates light and modern life for a young family in North London. The new layout gives the family distinct kitchen, dining and relaxation zones, and views to the large rear garden from numerous angles within the home. The owners wanted to update the property in a way that would maximise the available space and reconnect different areas while leaving them clearly defined. Rather than building the common, open box extension, Amos Goldreich Architecture created distinctly separate yet connected spaces both externally and internally using an asymmetric form united by pale white bricks. Previously the rear plan of the house was divided into a kitchen, dining room and conservatory. The kitchen and dining room were very dark; the kitchen was incredibly narrow and the late 90’s UPVC conservatory was thermally inefficient. Bringing in natural light and creating views into the garden where the clients’ children often spend time playing were both important elements of the brief. Amos Goldreich Architecture designed a large X by X metre box window in the centre of the sitting room that offers views from both the sitting area and dining table, meaning the clients can keep an eye on the children while working or relaxing. Amos Goldreich Architecture enlivened and lightened the home by working with materials that encourage the diffusion of light throughout the spaces. Exposed timber rafters create a clever shelving screen, functioning both as open storage and a permeable room divider to maintain the connection between the sitting area and kitchen. A deep blue kitchen with plywood handle detailing creates balance and contrast against the light tones of the pale timber and white walls. The new extension is clad in white bricks which help to bounce light around the new interiors, emphasise the freshness and newness, and create a clear, distinct separation from the existing part of the late Victorian semi-detached London home. Brick continues to make an impact in the patio area where Amos Goldreich Architecture chose to use Stone Grey brick pavers for their muted tones and durability. A sedum roof spans the entire extension giving a beautiful view from the first floor bedrooms. The sedum roof also acts to encourage biodiversity and collect rainwater. Continues Amos Goldreich, Director of Amos Goldreich Architecture says: “The Framework House was a fantastic project to work on with our clients. We thought carefully about the space planning to ensure we met the brief for distinct zones, while also keeping a connection to the outdoors and others in the space. “The materials of the project also had to marry with the new plan. We chose to keep the interiors fresh, calm, and clean so our clients could adapt their future interior design choices easily without the need to renovate the space again.” Clients, Tom and Jennifer Allen say: “I couldn’t have envisioned having a space like this. It has completely changed the way we live as a family for the better. We are more connected, yet also have our own spaces to work, eat, play, learn and relax.” “The extension has had an impact on the entire house. When our son looks out of his window on the first floor, he sees a beautiful planted roof that merges with the garden.”
Scandinavian Kitchen
Scandinavian Kitchen
No.54 InteriorsNo.54 Interiors
Bespoke Scandi kitchen, featuring rustic oak veneer and meganite solid surface worktop. Track lighting and feature splashback in pebble tiles. Vintage furniture.
Kent Farmhouse Kitchen Renovation
Kent Farmhouse Kitchen Renovation
Golden Feathers InteriorsGolden Feathers Interiors
Bespoke Kitchen, Kitchen, kitchen design, carpentry, danish design, marble, oak kitchen, 4 seater kitchen, bespoke build

Scandinavian Kitchen Ideas and Designs

The Entertainer
The Entertainer
Sola KitchensSola Kitchens
A showstopper! This Scandinavian styled kitchen is set to impress featuring a beautiful large white pigmented oak island. The worktop is particularly unique in that it is half oak and half stainless steel. The open planned kitchen merges into the living room making this the perfect entertaining area. Even this family’s house rabbits love bouncing around the kitchen!
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Ireland
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