jo_paull

3D loft plans required to visualise height and sloped ceilings

Jo Paull
last month
last modified: last month

Hello, we are looking at converting our loft

the ceiling is quite low and I’d really love to be able to walk through the plans virtually to see if it works ok with the height. Is there a software program or a service that does this?

There is another section of roof which is even lower and I wondered if this could be raised to create a bigger bedroom and maybe glaze the end wall? I’ve attached plans. Or any other ideas would be welcome 🙏





Comments (11)

  • cannonja
    last month

    Jo save you the trouble
    Your wasting your time and money 💰
    You don't have any space, use the loft for storage
    if you can't visualize it , measure it on a wall and use a string line for slopes
    Your loft is tiny, there is an alternative but it could blow your budget

    Jo Paull thanked cannonja
  • Jo Paull
    Original Author
    last month
    last modified: last month

    Oh dear. Its 1900 high to the roof trust? And 2600 to the apex of the roof Is that too low?

  • Jonathan
    last month

    If you have 1900 high roofing trusses the 2200 ridge height is irrelevant because your ceiling will be the trusses.... in fact with insulation and board the ceiling will be a little lower.

    And the ceilings of the ground floor will be fixed to beams that are not strong enough to be an upstairs floor so likely your floor level will come up.

    And most of the space in your loft will have much less height than in the very centre.

    To put it into context if your downstairs rooms have standard doors they will be 1981mm high (plus architrave).

    This means there will be insufficient height at the top of your stairs (and I believe build regs says this has to be 2m). And finding a door to put on the bathroom will be a problem, but mostly you will only be able to stand up in the very middle of the room.

    People do convert their lofts to have this kind of space but find it doesn’t add resale value.

    There may also be building regs issues with the stairs rising from a space that is open to the kitchen.

    Have you built the house already? Can you change the design to have a higher roof?

    Jo Paull thanked Jonathan
  • Sarah L
    last month
    Jo Paull thanked Sarah L
  • pmasmith3
    last month

    I’ve read that it’s possible to ‘raise the roof’ which involves removing the existing roof and trusses and replacing the whole thing with a new roof with a steeper pitch. We have a 60s bungalow and the loft space is vast but there just isn’t enough head room. I haven’t had any quotes but I would guess that it would be much more than double a normal loft conversion. It’s all academic for me as I’ve yet to convince my husband that it would be worth doing!

    Jo Paull thanked pmasmith3
  • Jonathan
    last month

    Given it’s likely a timber frame house you will need to get expert advice about adding an extra floor because of the additional weight

    Jo Paull thanked Jonathan
  • Jo Paull
    Original Author
    last month

    Yes the house is 16 years old. The

    attic is already boarded out. It’s actually 2600 to the apex my apologies, not that you think that matters. Maybe a dormer is required?

  • Jo Paull
    Original Author
    last month

    I think if the stairs came up into the middle of the room between trusses then you’d get the required height

  • Jo Paull
    Original Author
    last month



  • PRO
    Katie Older Lighting Design
    last month

    Hi Jo,

    I am a lighting designer and can advice on the lighting scheme and specify.

    Kind regards, Katie

Ireland
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