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debbi_jayne_challenger


My partner made all our fencing front and back. The back is 6ft with a 2 foot trellis on top, as we have 6 dogs, so it needs to be secure. It took him ages to make the trellis and paint it all, but well worth it. He also put old mirrored wardrobe doors on the bottom to give the illusion of the garden being larger, but has had to put fine wire over it to stop the birds flying into it. Our front fencing is picket fencing that he also made himself (needs a paint at the mo!)

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deborah eade

Lynda, quite agree. Also mixed hedges are far better for wildlife, particularly birds. And less susceptible to disease, the reason I dug up the privet hedge we inherited 23 years ago, and which was gradually and then rapidly dying. The new one has roses, escallonia, a bit of winter jasmine root, variegated holly and photinia and lots of spring bulbs. Early days still ...

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keiblem

I appreciate that this article is primarily about wooden fencing, there is a small reference to metal and hedges. However despite statistics I am sure there are plenty of us out there who do not want wood. I for one feel it is overused and can be oppressive.

What about brick and stone. In many instances both would likely suit the location and style of the property better. Granted they are much more expensive but I am sure, unlike timber, they would add value particularly if the materials match the style and period of the house. If cost is an issue then reserve this treatment for the front. Mixed materials such as metal railings atop a brick wall would bring the cost down.

Don’t underestimate the value of a hedge for the back garden. It takes time to grow but patience has its rewards. A hedge comes in many shapes and colours. It can have a soft texture or be prickly if security is a concern. Best of all it serves as a good backdrop to plants and offers a habitat for our much beleaguered wildlife. If you haven’t the time or inclination to cut a hedge, which is I believe the reason fences have become so popular, then why not try chainlink fencing. It is less oppressive than wood, cheaper and longer lasting. It allows a multitude of plants to climb through it providing privacy, security and a wildlife habitat. In the same time it takes a hedge to grow you will have what is in essence a hedge without the need for an annual haircut.

One final word. Whatever you choose to cordon off your plot please have a thought for the hedgehog and put in a ‘door’ to allow it to continue to wander.

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